My KUTX: aGLIFF’s Jim Brunzell

My KUTX

My KUTX: aGLIFF’s Jim Brunzell

Posted by on Aug 26, 2016

Photo by Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUTX

Starting September 8th and running through the 11th, the Austin Gay & Lesbian International Film Festival (a.k.a. aGLIFF) returns to the Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar for its 29th year. 30 feature films and 47 short films take the spotlight this year, including screenings of classics like Hedwig and the Angry Inch to new originals and documentaries.

This week on My KUTX, aGLIFF program director Jim Brunzell takes a similar cinematic approach with his guest DJ set. He takes us back to his Twin Cities upbringing and forward to his burgeoning love of Austin music, and he’s a great, incredibly-knowledgeable tour guide. Tune in on Saturday, August 27 at 6 p.m. or listen anytime at the bottom of the page.

–Art Levy // producer, My KUTX

Playlist:

1. Explosions In The Sky – “The Ecstatics”

2. Statistics – “Hours Seemed Like Days”

3. sElf – “Meg Ryan”

4. Beulah – “The Rise And Fall or Our Hero’s Reward”

5. …And You Will Know Us By The Trail Of Dead – “Mistakes And Regrets”

6. Dillinger Four – “Define ‘Learning Disorder’”

7. Texas Is The Reason – “If It’s Here When We Get Back It’s Ours”

8. Pavement – “Date With IKEA”

9. Sleater-Kinney – “Dance Song ‘97”

10. Liz Phair – “Headache”

11. Whale – “Kickin’”

12. Cat Stevens – “Where Do The Children Play?”

13. Bran Van 3000 – “Everywhere”

14. The Format – “If Work Permits”

Working For A Nuclear Free City: “Bottle Rocket”

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Working For A Nuclear Free City: “Bottle Rocket”

Posted by on Aug 26, 2016

Manchester’s Working for a Nuclear Free City is using the past tense when referring to their existence, even though their fourth official album, What Do People Do All Day?, was released earlier this year. Too bad, really, because they concoct some terrific and understated music, hypnotic yet hyper-aware.

“Bottle Rocket” is built upon just one note deftly anchored by a bumping bass line worthy of Bootsy Collins. Guitars attack in unexpected places, like a broom sweeping out the darkened corners of a movie theater, and beeping and squonking at random are semi-hidden sounds from vintage video arcade games. “Bottle Rocket” is a shining descendant of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, except instead of spoken words of unrelated monologues, this features the inverted vocal melodies of Gary McClure. The rest of the album is just as tasty, serving up short gems from the Guided By Voices playbook along with gentle ambient songs that quickly flash with thunder and lightning to keep things interesting.

“Bottle Rocket” appears on What Do People Do All Day?, out now.

–Rick McNulty // host, Left of the Dial (Fridays, 7-11 p.m.), Rhythm & Blues (Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.)

of Montreal: “it’s different for girls”

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of Montreal: “it’s different for girls”

Posted by on Aug 24, 2016

Photo by Chad Kamenshine

Anyone who’s seen of Montreal’s Kevin Barnes saunter onstage riding a horse knows the band likes to push buttons, but there’s substance behind the flash. Barnes spills his blood on the lyric page, detailing fizzling relationships while dressing up the woe in sunny duds. It’s the old adage come to life: you gotta laugh just to keep from crying.

Of Montreal’s new album Innocence Reaches returns to the fresh wounds of Barnes’ divorce, but his cutting wit is still intact. On “it’s different for girls,” the one-liners come thick and fast: “They are mercurial creatures, not a masculine dissonance / Or sexual currency”; “For every one psycho bitch, there’s ten thousand aggro pricks.” There’s truth to every barb. Throughout his career, Barnes has reveled in gender-bending, but here, he’s showing that there are real social differences between men and women. This song isn’t filled with empty empowerment platitudes; it’s about setting the record straight, all to a snappy disco beat.

“it’s different for girls” appears on Innocence Reaches, out now via Polyvinyl. Of Montreal plays the Mohawk on Friday, October 28.

–Art Levy // host, Sundays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., producer, My KUTX

Weyes Blood: “Seven Words”

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Weyes Blood: “Seven Words”

Posted by on Aug 22, 2016

Front Row Seat To Earth, the title of the fourth album from Santa Monica’s Weyes Blood (a.k.a. Natalie Mering), seems like it should accompany those shots from an orbiting space station that are both awe-inspiring and a little unreal. Her music also sits at this intersection, a dreamlike procession of stately folk-pop that moves slow but nonetheless leaves you captivated.

“Seven Words” shows the end of a relationship in this slow motion. Mering builds each sentiment piece-by-piece, piling on bits of slide guitar and organ to propel everything to a grand finale. She takes a widescreen view while still zooming in on little details that are worth pouring over.

“Seven Words” appears on Front Row Seat To Earth, out October 21 via Mexican Summer.

–Art Levy // host, Sundays, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., producer, My KUTX

Allah-Las: “Could Be You”

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Allah-Las: “Could Be You”

Posted by on Aug 19, 2016

“If you had the chance to / Would you do it all again?” Everyone goes through that kind of self-examination at least once in their lives. On “Could Be You,” L.A.’s Allah-Las turn that theme into strummy, propelling folk-rock, all while looking back at diverged paths. The quartet’s own path took a fortuitous turn after three members met each other in 2008 while working at the famed Amoeba Music. Across three albums, Allah-Las have honed a tricky L.A.-inspired sound that’s equally dark and sunny. “Could Be You” turns memories into question marks, and the band attacks them with a Velvet Underground-esque scalpel.

“Could Be You” appears on Calico Review, out September 9 via Mexican Summer.

–Art Levy // host, Sundays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., producer, My KUTX