Food Group: “Lakespirit”

Song of the Day

Food Group: “Lakespirit”

Posted by on Dec 8, 2017

Austin psych-rock explorers Food Group blend genres and incorporate acoustic sounds to make reflective experimental music. Formed in 2013, the band consists of singer and guitarist Eric Lyday, keyboardist Wiley Greene, bassist Luis Rangel, and drummer Jeff Olson—with a rotating group of friends that provide additional instrumentation and fill in every now and then. Food Group’s sound has evolved since their early single-microphone demos, incorporating elements of chamber pop, folk, and electronic music. Their more recent efforts have been sonically darker and more progressive while still touching on the themes of love, loss, and spirituality that are present in their earlier work. 

With “Lakespirit,” Food Group takes their psychedelic journey underwater. The instrumentation seems to move around Eric Lyday’s singing until it reaches a fever pitch of wailing organs and crash cymbals. The live interpretation of “Lakespirit” recorded in Studio 1A features arpeggios that are even dreamier and brings attention to Lyday’s vocals in particular. We were very lucky to have the band visit KUTX and add a new dimension to one of Food Group’s most energetic and romantic songs. The jangling guitars and spacey synths work like a long extended metaphor, equating the feeling of love to the feeling of floating.

“Lakespirit” appears on Here Today, out now via Bandcamp. Food Group will be playing a free show at Cheer Up Charlie’s on Saturday, December 9th with Particle Devotion, Lola Tried, The Hermits, and Ama.

-Harold Urteaga, KUTX Music Intern

 

Protextor & Brother Bear 12.5.17

From The Vault

Protextor & Brother Bear 12.5.17

Posted by on Dec 6, 2017

Since first meeting at a toy store, fun has appropriately informed the separate musical styles of Adam Protextor and Matt Puckett. Protextor, formerly known as “p-Tek,” was the founder of the Weird City Hip Hop Fest and Austin Mic Exchange. Puckett, his friend of seven years, produces and performs as “Brother Bear,” but is also familiar as one of the fronting members of Mother Falcon. Now living in New York, the Grammy-winning producer used this past year as an opportunity to go all-in on a new full-length album with Protextor. American Neon is the dream wedding of Protextor & Brother Bear’s musical sensibilities: a slick and glitzy genre bender comprised of pop-leaning arrangements paired with funky horns and rap hooks. It features input from a wide range of musicians, including members of This Will Destroy You, Austin’s own Mélat, and breakout Chicago rapper CupcakKe. Protextor & Brother Bear stopped by Studio 1A last night for KUTX After Hours. If you missed their session, check it out below!

– Harold Urteaga

**Upcoming Shows**

12/7 @ Sidewinder (Album Release Party)


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Jack Anderson’s Top Tracks of 2017

Features

Jack Anderson’s Top Tracks of 2017

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017

Jack Anderson is music host Monday through Wednesday 8 – 11 p.m. and Saturday 6 – 10 a.m. Here are his top 5 songs of the year:

 

1) !!! – NRGQ

High intensity digital disco dancer complete with !!!’s signature “dance-punk” mid-song call and response breakdown.

2) Cilantro Boombox – Living in a Box

Get funked up with a message about putting the phone down and living more in the moment. Perfect for today’s social media superficialities.

3) Washed Out – Hard to Say Goodbye

Sample-based deep house. Toro Y Moi-esque vocals. What’s not to like?

4) RoyBoy – Fall Back

Sade & Bobby Caldwell-influenced R&B from this Austin-based up-and-comer.

5) Ty Richards – Going Out For a Cigarette

This local-yet-intergalactic modern day Steve Miller kills it with laid back vocals on this one.

Jacquie Fuller’s Top Tracks of 2017

Features

Jacquie Fuller’s Top Tracks of 2017

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017

Jacquie Fuller is our Assistant Program Director. Here are her top 5 songs of the year:

 

1) Broken Social Scene – Hug of Thunder

This song is an exercise in duality – it’s heavy and weightless; it restrains and explodes. Milan Kundera would probably dig it. Also, I love that Feist and the band wrote it while Kevin Drew was in another room – it feels a little subversive.

2) Walker Lukens – Don’t Wanna Be Lonely

I’ve always liked Walker Lukens, but of course Jim Eno would be the one to take me from like to love. This song is 100% groove. I want to say something deep and intellectual about it, but I only feel it in my body.

3) Spoon – Do I Have to Talk You Into It?

Okay, so yes, this is sort of “The Beast and Dragon Adored” funked-up a bit, and I want you to know that Spoon could just recycle all their old songs from here on out and I’d keep paying my hard-earned money for them. So the answer is: no, duh, you don’t, never.

4) Juana Molina – Cosoco

Locomotive, playful, weird. I just want to get high and listen to this song all day while watching back-to-back episodes of The Discovery Channel’s How It’s Made.

5) Sweet Spirit – The Power

Gary Glitter was a perv and, starting right now, this song shall replace every one of his songs at every sporting event ever. “The Power” is a feminist jock jam.

Rick McNulty’s Top Tracks of 2017

Features

Rick McNulty’s Top Tracks of 2017

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017

Rick McNulty is Producer and hosts Left of the Dial Friday night 7 – 11 p.m. and Uptown Saturday Night from 7 – 11 p.m. Here are his top 5 songs of the year:

 

1) Matthew Logan Vasquez – Same
With a string arrangement straight out of “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” and what sounds like the amen corner of The Raelettes threading throughout the song, I can’t get enough of this sweet stuff. Vasquez puts his prodigious lungs to good use. And I swear there’s a wonky Moog synth!

2) Thundercat – Show You The Way (ft. Michael McDonald & Kenny Loggins) 
I love the recent revival of yacht rock and no one gets it more than Stephen Bruner (aka Thundercat), so much so that he asked the captains who invented the genre to join him on his sloop. It was a stroke of genius to literally introduce Kenny Loggins and Michael McDonald on this track.

3) Childish Gambino – Have Some Love
It’s a pastiche, definitely, but if you’re going to appropriate something it may as well be the glory days of Parliament/Funkadelic. It’s a spiritual sequel to “Can You Get To That,” which is all you really need to know. Long live the P-Funk!

4) Sinkane – U’Huh
Sinkane is a well-traveled Sudanese-American who offers a fresh bit of optimism and something danceable for the coming end times. I want to believe him when he says “we’re all gonna be alright.”

5) Naked Giants – Ya Ya
Guitar. Thunder. More guitar. Repeat. For ever.