Jacquie Fuller

KUTX Staff

Jacquie Fuller

Posted by on Oct 3, 2017
photo by Emma Martin

Assistant Program Director


What musical experience most set you on the path to a career in radio?

When I was a kid, I wanted to be the Frost Bank time and temperature lady. I was obsessed – I used to call her several times a day, and I still know the number by heart. Voicing KUT & KUTX’s underwriting is about as close as I’ll get. I’ve loved music since I was young, too; I was a latchkey kid in the early days of MTV. So I guess working in public radio combines two childhood obsessions. I deejayed in college but thought that was the end of the line; I didn’t want to work for commercial radio, and I never associated public radio with music that wasn’t classical or jazz. In 2005, I moved to Minnesota and, soon after, started working at The Current, which is the Twin Cities’ version of KUTX. I lived in MN for ten years, but couldn’t shake my homesickness for Texas, so I set my sights on KUTX. In 2015, I Goodwilled all my wool tights and came back home for this job.

 

What’s your favorite Austin music experience so far?

Back in ’99, my friend Jordan and I decided we were going to try our luck at SXSW, sans wristbands. We ended up having this wild weekend where we got into an at-capacity Flaming Lips show for free, drank beer backstage with the bands at Waterloo Park, ate dinner at Stubb’s with Guided By Voices, and then talked our way into a late-night show featuring Built to Spill, with the GBV guys in tow. The following year, I attended SXSW with a press badge and had no memorable experiences whatsoever.

My most recent memorable experience was the first KUTX Live at Mueller we put on. I was new at my job, the event was something of an experiment, and I was feeling generally nervous about it. We had a great turnout, and when Spoon’s Jim Eno showed up with his kid, it felt totally full-circle. Like Austin was welcoming me home.

 

Why public rather than commercial radio?

I’ve only ever worked in public radio and I recognize what a privilege it is. We get to take risks here that our commercial colleagues can’t afford to, even though a lot of them are music lovers, too. We get to help propel emerging bands and artists to a level where commercial stations will pay attention to them. We’re allowed to play music that’s really meaningful to our listeners. The difference is member support, and I’ll never take that for granted. Our members are everything.

 

How do you spend your time when you’re not spinning records on the air?

I’m actually pretty boring. Because I work a lot of live music events for KUTX, when I’m not working, I just want to watch Netflix and hang out with my spouse and kid. I rarely stay up past 11. I got a degree in Creative Writing, so occasionally I write. Lately, I’ve gotten into baking. I think it’s not long before I start telling kids to get off my lawn.

 

Finish the sentence: “Austin Music Is ….”

… the sound of home. I enjoyed my years in Minnesota, but there were some dark days in the middle of winter there, where I’d be listening to Sir Douglas Quintet or Spoon or Freddy Fender while trudging through the snow, and it would conjure in my mind a backyard barbecue on a warm day with everybody drinking Lone Star tallboys, and I’d come close to tears. Texas is just where I belong.

 

Elizabeth McQueen

KUTX Staff

Elizabeth McQueen

Posted by on Sep 7, 2017

Producer/Host: Sa 10a-2p


What musical experience most set you on the path to a career in radio?

I moved to Austin in my twenties to play music. After about a year here, I started to think about other jobs that interested me and I public radio came to mind. I’d been an avid public radio listener since my teens. I was in love with KUT — I loved the breath of music they played, I loved the support they gave to Austin musicians and John Aielli was a bright light in my life — so I applied for an internship. I helped Jeff McCord in the music department for about six months before I left to concentrate on my own music. I was lucky enough to spend the next decade making and playing music, both on my own and with Asleep at the Wheel. During that time my love for public radio stayed strong. When I left the Wheel I knew that I wanted to be a part of KUTX, and luckily, they let me come on as a member of the weekend on air-staff and let me start the This Song podcast. What can I say, I just love playing music — both my own and other people’s — and talking about music. KUTX is the kind of place where I can have a job doing what I love. Which is just cool.

 

What’s your favorite Austin music experience so far?

This town and the music that’s made here has been a full life experience for me. I met my husband because of Austin music, I’ve played in bands with people who’ve become my extended family and I’ve been constantly inspired by the creativity bursting out of everyone around me.

Why public rather than commercial radio?

I’m so into the idea that people can create the beauty they want to see in the world, and public radio is the perfect example of this. It only exists because the community wants it to exists and supports it’s mission. How cool is that?

 

How do you spend your time when you’re not spinning records on the air?

I hang out with my incredible daughters and husband, teach voice for Anthropos Arts, Emcee events, play the occasional gig and am co-president of the Maplewood PTA. Go Mustangs!

 

Finish the sentence: “Austin Music Is ….”

…my home.


KUTX Responsibilities

This Song

Bill Childs

KUTX Staff

Bill Childs

Posted by on Sep 7, 2017

Host: Su 6p – 7p

 


What musical experience most set you on the path to a career in radio?

I grew up in the Twin Cities, which has a pretty great history of radio on both the commercial side; KJ-104, KLBB, Rev-105, and non-comm; Radio K, KFAI, and the Minnesota Public Radio juggernaut, including news, classical, and The Current. I did radio in college at Macalester, 10 Blazing Watts of Power, and always was looking for a way back in…and so I started Spare the Rock back in 2005. Of course, as for many radio people of my age, I’d be lying if I didn’t also mention watching WKRP in Cincinnati.

 

What’s your favorite Austin music experience so far?

I love being a member of Black Fret, getting to support local artists as they figure out the next step, and I adore Sound on Sound, and Fun Fun Fun before that.

 

Why public rather than commercial radio?

I’ve been on both, and our show is syndicated to other stations, including some commercial, and I have a lot of love for many commercial stations too. But public radio, it seems to me, is more consistently truly about the local community, about connecting that local community to the broader world, whether musical or otherwise, and about music discovery.

 

How do you spend your time when you’re not spinning records on the air?

I hang out with our kids — I especially love watching Liam’s marching band in the fall (go LBJ Jaguars); I run a record label that has raised over $125,000 in donations for non-profits, and I see a lot of music. Plus I have a day job as a lawyer.

 

Finish the sentence: “Austin Music Is ….”

…so freaking great I can hardly stand it.

Paul Carrubba

KUTX Staff

Paul Carrubba

Posted by on Sep 7, 2017

Host Sunday 2-5p


What musical experience most set you on the path to a career in radio?

It’s probably a combination of writing about music and playing music myself; usually with more enthusiasm than skill. I was doing a second tour at UT trying to get a master’s in journalism, and I needed an internship. I applied to an editor position with the news side of KUT and they took a look at my resume which was all music writing, and thankfully they said I would be a better fit with the music folks. I started my radio journey as an intern for David Brown’s Texas Music Matters. I’m every grateful for David and the team at TMM for giving this radio noob a chance. I helped co-produce the Song of the Day for a while, and finally worked up the courage to ask to be a DJ. Susan first showed me the on-the-air ropes, and I couldn’t have had a better teacher. Getting to occasionally cover the 11pm to 3am shift Friday and Saturday nights was a great intro into the weird and wonderful world of radio. I’m still proud, and slightly surprised, that I got to play Steely Dan within 15 minutes of The Misfits. Long story short, I was always better with the music bit of music journalism than the journalism part. I feel really, really, really lucky they let me flex those muscles every Sunday.

 

What’s your favorite Austin music experience so far?

Oh man, I don’t think there are enough ones and zeros on the internet to let me fully expound upon some of my favorite musical experiences. Most of them are SXSW-related. I always love wandering and being surprised by what I find. I think that’s consistently my favorite Austin music experience: constant discovery. Some runner-ups include like five or six years ago being, what I can only describe as, hypnotized by Sabrina Ellis playing with A Giant Dog at The Grand on a Monday night. I hadn’t heard of them before, but I’ll never forget them because of that performance. Another is a particular show with one of my now defunct bands at a now defunct bar. It was our first “real” show in public. And I once read an Iggy Pop quote that I remember as, “When all else fails, play ‘Louie Louie.'” Now that quote is kind of a personal mantra of mine that I take to mean, when the going gets tough, go with simple and what you know. At that show, I took it literally. We ran out of our songs, but the crowd (i.e. the friends we roped into coming) wanted more. So I just started playing those first chords….and it was awesome.

 

Why public rather than commercial radio?

Did you read that bit above about playing Steely Dan and the Misfits in the same shift?

 

How do you spend your time when you’re not spinning records on the air?

You mean when I’m not spinning 60s garage rock and soul records at home? I work as a content strategist for a local experience design studio called Mighty & True. I love riding my bike, and keep telling myself that I’m going to get my guitar out again. I love making cocktails at home, and I’ve got a small, but I think quite eclectic bar set up. I also just started taking improv classes, and I’m pretty stoked about that.

 

Finish the sentence: “Austin Music Is ….”

…always moving forward.

John L. Hanson

KUTX Staff

John L. Hanson

Posted by on Aug 25, 2017

Host: F 4-7p

 


What musical experience most set you on the path to a career in radio?

Growing up in Detroit in the 60’s was the best time ever. I listened to the radio all the time; it was always on in our home. Plus I couldn’t sing so the next best thing was to play the music.

 

What’s your favorite Austin music experience so far?

Being able to MC the Temptations concert when they played UT back in the 70’s.

 

Why public rather than commercial radio?

Public radio was the only medium that gave me my first full-time job in radio.

 

How do you spend your time when you’re not spinning records on the air?

Doing research for ‘In Black America’ and planning the next ‘Old School Dance Party.’

 

Finish the sentence: “Austin Music Is ….”

…the music that got you in trouble!


Other Work

KUT In Black America