This Song: The Wombats

This Song

This Song: The Wombats

Posted by on Nov 9, 2018

Matthew Murphy, aka “Murph,” from the British rock band The Wombats describes how hearing Weezer’s “Say It Ain’t So” and Radiohead’s “Creep” when he was a teenager set him on an alt-rock path, and describes what it’s like to talk about songwriting with Paul McCartney.

Listen to this episode of This Song

 

Listen to The Wombats’ New Record Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life

Watch the Wombats perform an acoustic version of  “Lemon To a Knife Fight” backstageat ACLfest

Subscribe via the Podcasts App, iTunes or Stitcher to get the new episodes of This Song delivered to you as soon as they come out.

 

Listen to Songs from this episode of This Song

 

This Song: Superfónicos

This Song

This Song: Superfónicos

Posted by on Nov 7, 2018

As the singer and Gaita player for the Austin based Afro Columbian band Superfónicos, Jaime Ospina often finds musical inspiration in some pretty interesting places. In this episode, Jaime talks about his love for Gary Clark Jr’s song “When My Train Pulls In” and how the Blues Brothers soundtrack pushed him to discover roots music from his own country. Plus, he tells us how African American music can help us all survive and thrive in an increasingly chaotic world.

📸 Gabriel Perez

Listen to this Episode of This Song

 

Check out Superfónicos Tour Dates

Listen to Superfónicos new EP “Suelta”

Check out Superfónicos MyKUTX guest DJ Set

Check out Superfónicos Studio 1A performance

Subscribe via the Podcasts App, iTunes or Stitcher to get the new episodes of This Song delivered to you as soon as they come out.

Listen to Songs from this episode of This Song

This Song: Listener Episode

This Song

This Song: Listener Episode

Posted by on Oct 31, 2018

The This Song listener episode is finally here! Emily La Framboise describes how Tracy Chapman’s “Fast Car” got her interested in social justice. Lee Miller explains how “Darling Be Home Soon” by the Lovin’ Spoonful helped him discover his love of songwriting.   We revisit Joanna Castillo as she explores the heartbreaking beauty of Kathy Mattea’s “Where’ve You Been.”  And Charlie Press tells us about the impact that the Rolling Stones  “Sympathy for the Devil” had on him as a young child.

 

Thanks to everyone who shared  their transformative musical experiences with us! We’re going to make another listener episode!  If that sounds like something you want to be a part of all you have to do is record your story about a song that changed your life to a voice memo and email it to us at [email protected]

Listen to this episode of This Song

 

Subscribe via the Podcasts App, iTunes or Stitcher to get the new episodes of This Song delivered to you as soon as they come out.

Become a member at KUTX

Get more information about voting in Texas at kutx.org/vote

 

Listen to Songs from this episode of This Song

 

This Song Extra: Elvis Costello

This Song

This Song Extra: Elvis Costello

Posted by on Oct 18, 2018

In this This Song Extra, Elvis Costello explains why he wanted to get outside of himself and tell other people’s stories in an expansive musical style on his new record Look Now.

Photo by James OMara

Listen to This Episode of This Song

 

 

Check out Elvis Costello and the Imposters’ Tour Dates

Subscribe via the Podcasts App, iTunes or Stitcher to get the new episodes of This Song delivered to you as soon as they come out.

 

 

 

This Song Extra: Janelle Monáe

This Song

This Song Extra: Janelle Monáe

Posted by on Oct 9, 2018

Janelle Monáe talks to host Elizabeth McQueen after her performance at the Austin City Limits Music Festival about music, love and voting.

Today, October 9th is the last day to register to vote in Texas in order to be eligible to vote on November 6th.

 

Check out kutx.org/voteOur sister station KUT did an article on Everything You Need to Know to Register to Vote in Texas.📸 Gabriel C. Pérez/KUTX

Subscribe via the Podcasts App, iTunes or Stitcher to get the new episodes of This Song delivered to you as soon as they come out.