DRINT 3.5.20

Studio 1A Sessions

DRINT 3.5.20

Posted by on Mar 9, 2020

Photo by Gabriel C. Pérez/KUTX

Roddrinskee Johnson is DRINT – the embodiment of what it means to be a self-made Austin musician. He blends contemporary R&B with lush pop textures and crystalline language to create a fresh sound that captures the youthful energy of the Austin R&B scene. His most recent release is Don’t Save Me is a soulful declaration of his own vulnerabilities. Johnson is joined in the studio by Alejandro Rios on guitar Marshall Moon on keys.

– Lydia Fortuna, KUTX Intern

BANDCAMP || TWITTER || INSTAGRAM || FACEBOOK

Host: Confucius and Fresh of The Breaks

Audio Engineers: Cliff Hargrove

Producer: Deidre Gott

Cameras: Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon, Gabriel Perez


Longriver 3.4.20

Studio 1A Sessions

Longriver 3.4.20

Posted by on Mar 6, 2020

Photo by Gabriel C. Pérez/KUTX

Longriver is David Longoria‘s gentle and transcendent folk music that offers a quieter and more intimate view of his work as a musician. He has also worked with .…And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead and Bill Baird while also fronting his own rock band, The Black. In contrast to his other projects, Longriver slows down and uses gentle guitar fingerpicking accompanied by cello, upright bass, and musical saw to take a step away from the shortcomings of modern society and go on an independent soul-searching journey. Longoria is joined in the studio by Lindsey Verrill on cello, Jeff Johnston on musical saw, and Evan Joyce on upright bass.

You can see Longriver live at the Cactus Cafe on Friday, March 6th with support from Warm Sugar and Jordan Moser.

– Lydia Fortuna, KUTX Intern

WEBSITE || INSTAGRAM || FACEBOOK

Host: Laurie Gallardo

Audio Engineer: Cliff Hargrove

Producer: Deidre Gott

Cameras: Gabriel C. Pérez, José Daniel Moreno

Editor: José Daniel Moreno


A. Sinclair 2.19.20

Studio 1A Sessions

A. Sinclair 2.19.20

Posted by on Mar 4, 2020

Photo courtesy of A. Sinclair

A. Sinclair, songwriting moniker of frontman Aaron Sinclair, has spent years as an Austin garage rock staple. Their 2020 EP In the Middle of the Night was released on February 14th. Though his songwriting still remains true to his experiences, his lyrics have begun to reflect the recent changes in his life; the track titled “A Hundred Million Thousand” refers to how Sinclair describes his love for his two young daughters. Listen to that track and “Weeds” live in Studio 1A below.

You can see A. Sinclair live at Waterloo Records on Thursday the 20th and at Hole in the Wall on February 28th.

– Lydia Fortuna, KUTX Intern

Host: Laurie Gallardo

Audio Engineer: Jake Perlman

Producer: Deidre Gott

Cameras: Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon, Patricia Lim, José Daniel Moreno, Steven Gonzalez

Editor: Julia Reihs

Strange Lot 2.24.20

Studio 1A Sessions

Strange Lot 2.24.20

Posted by on Mar 3, 2020

Photo by Michael Minasi/KUTX

Austin newcomers Strange Lot blend hazy garage sounds into their Western-sun-scorched take on psych rock. After 5 years of success, then-duo Dominic Mena (guitar, vocals) and Tim Lormor (drums) made the journey to Austin from their founding city of Phoenix in 2019. As Austinites they were joined by Luis Valerio on bass and by December, they had signed with Mas Music Records in anticipation of their February 2020 release Mindstate

Join Strange Lot in celebration of their album release at Hotel Vegas on February 29th.

– Lydia Fortuna, KUTX Intern

WEBSITE || INSTAGRAM || FACEBOOK || TWITTER

Host: Taylor Wallace

Audio Engineer: Jake Perlman

Producer: Deidre Gott

Cameras: Julia Reihs, Michael Minasi, Steven Gonzalez

Editors: Steven Gonzalez, Michael Minasi

Tame Impala – “The Slow Rush”

Album Reviews

Tame Impala – “The Slow Rush”

Posted by on Feb 24, 2020

Photo taken at Austin City Limits 2019 by Gabriel C. Pérez/KUTX

Tame Impala – The Slow Rush (Interscope/Fiction)

Rarely has music been this anticipated. Currents, the Tame Impala album that made Australian Kevin Parker the world’s most famous bedroom auteur, was released nearly five years ago. A mid-career milestone, Currents was the culmination of everything Parker had been working towards – a cyclone of reverb, keys, guitars and oft-kilter club beats throbbing under Parker’s soaring falsetto. Songs like “Let It Happen”, “Eventually” and especially,  “’ Cause I’m a Man” were distinct, memorable, even a bit visionary. Tame Impala’s second album, Lonerism, had already paved the road for a cult audience. Currents made it an expressway. Some collaborations, and lots of touring followed, but as time wore on, there was nothing from Parker but radio silence.

Finally, in the spring of last year, two new “teaser tracks” showed up. The first, “Patience”, hinted at an exciting new direction – it was visceral, less disembodied, and by Parker’s standards, felt almost unfinished. It’s not on the album.

The second single, “Borderline”, a thumping Tame Impala confection, deals with an awakening of sorts. After releasing the single (and performing both new songs on Saturday Night Live), Parker continued to fuss with it. The album version is denser, the vocals barely claw their way to the surface. It’s also the album’s strongest track.

The Slow Rush, which finally saw the light of day on February 17, has evidence of Parker’s obsessive mitts all over it. Fastidious doesn’t begin to cover his work habits. Writing, producing and playing every instrument, the album sounds gorgeous and expansive.

Yet, after five years in which a lot of things happened (including Parker getting married and narrowly escaping a wildfire), Rush could hardly be called a departure. It seems to pick up right where Currents left off. There are some interesting experiments – the mechanized opening track, a long suite called “Posthumous Forgiveness”, which serves as an open letter to his father. Yet neither are entirely successful. Despite the regret of “Tomorrow’s Dust”, endearingly sad-sack songs “Feels Like We Only Go Backwards” or the brooding “Elephant” are absent. There’s a brighter aura among the album’s standouts – the loopy “Lost in Yesterday”, “Instant Destiny” ‘s Spector-ish pop, and the playful, pulsing “It Might Be Time”, (which manages to stay just steps ahead of Supertramp puffery).

His lyrics can veer toward platitudes, but they’re mostly about his now 33-year-old self. Other times they’re simply unintelligible. Parker is not prone to grand statements; his music is about mood. And his craft is undeniable. Parker toiled over every inch of this recording. It’s all there, the echo-laden mystery, the lush psychedelics, the same cheesy pop art cover. Yet chunks of The Low Rush pass by in a wash. It all seems all very familiar, and following the strength of his last two releases, lacking as much meat on its bones.

Parker is such a prodigious talent, it could be time for him to set sail into uncharted waters. We’ve seen what he can do in five years. Imagine the record he could knock out in two weeks.

– Jeff McCord, KUTX Music Editor

3.75

Listen to The Slow Rush here.