Sonny Rollins

Liner Notes

Sonny Rollins

Posted by on Jun 12, 2015

Sonny Rollins pioneered a bass drum rhythm section with no piano so his saxophone playing would stand out as well as be a rhythm instrument itself. Rollins joined the Miles Davis Quintet in 1955.

Pharoah Sanders

Liner Notes

Pharoah Sanders

Posted by on Jun 12, 2015

Pharoah Sanders is an American jazz saxophonist who came up along side John Coltrane to experiment with “sheets of sound”, and went on to become one of the most inventive composers and musicians in the Avant-garde movement. In this edition of Liner Notes, Rabbi and jazz historian Neil Blumofe, talks about what we can learn about presence and living in the moment, from the life and work of Pharoah Sanders.

Lee Konitz

Liner Notes

Lee Konitz

Posted by on Jun 11, 2015

Lee Konitz is an American jazz composer and alto saxophonist, who continues to build space for evolving styles and techniques in his work on the alto-sax. Inspired by Benny Goodman, Konitz carved out a sound that was, at times, contrary to prevailing ideas of what was “cool” in jazz in the shadow of Charlie Parker.

In this edition of Liner Notes, Rabbi and jazz historian Neil Blumofe talks about the importance of Konitz’s life and work, and what his dedication to his craft can teach us about re-inventing our days and selves as we live.

King Curtis

Liner Notes

King Curtis

Posted by on Jun 11, 2015

King Curtis was an American saxophonist, who played not only jazz, but R&B, rock n’ roll, and funk as well. His style was powerful and poignant, allowing moments to fully expand and develop. Unfortunately Curtis died young, murdered at the age of 37. In this installment of Liner Notes, Rabbi and jazz historian Neil Blumofe talks about what the life and legacy of King Curtis can teach us today.

Johnny Hodges

Liner Notes

Johnny Hodges

Posted by on Jun 11, 2015

Johnny Hodges was an American jazz alto saxophonist best known for his work with Duke Ellington’s big band and Billy Strayhorn. His sound was so smooth and melodic that Duke Ellington said, just his tone could bring a tear to your eye.

In this installment of Liner Notes Rabbi and jazz historian Neil Blumofe talks about what it means to add your voice to an ensemble, and to know that no matter how big of an impression you make it is but a blink of an eye in the cosmic landscape.

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