Old Settlers Music Festival 2017

Features

Old Settlers Music Festival 2017

Posted by on Dec 15, 2016

On April 20-23 2017, Driftwood, Texas will become a mecca for Roots & Americana music thanks to the Old Settler’s Music Festival. Single day tickets are now available along with the full lineup, and it’s better than ever.  Shakey Graves, Los Lobos and The Del McCoury Band are just a few of the headliners, while festival mainstays such as Shinyribs and Sarah Jarosz are back once again. Keep it locked to KUTX as we get closer to the festival, but for now, check out the lineup and videos from some of the performers!

SHAKEY GRAVES

THE DEL MCCOURY BAND

LOS LOBOS

 

 

 

Grammy-Nominated Texas Artists

Features

Grammy-Nominated Texas Artists

Posted by on Dec 7, 2016

We wanted to know how many of this year’s Grammy nominees were reared in the Lone Star State, and here they are- the Texas Artists nominated for a Grammy (or nine…)


NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 07: Entertainer Beyonce performs on stage during "The Formation World Tour" at the Citi Field on June 7, 2016 in the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Larry Busacca/PW/WireImage For Parkwood Entertainment)

Beyoncé (Houston, TX)

Record of the Year: Formation, from Lemonade

Album of the Year: Lemonade

Song of the Year: Formation, from Lemonade

Best Pop Solo Performance: Hold Up, from Lemonade

Best Rock Performance: Don’t Hurt Yourself (feat. Jack White), from Lemonade

Best Urban Contemporary Album: Lemonade

Best Rap/Sung Performance: Freedom (feat. Kendrick Lamar)

Best Music Video: Formation, from Lemonade

Best Music Film: Lemonade


maren morris

Maren Morris (Arlington, TX)

Best New Artist

Best Country Solo Performance: My Church, from Hero

Best Country Song: My Church, from Hero

Best Country Album: Hero


kelly clarkson

Kelly Clarkson (Fort Worth, TX)

Best Pop Solo Performance: Piece By Piece (Idol Version)


willie

Willie Nelson (Abbott, TX)

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: Summertime: Willie Sings Gershwin


Mandatory Credit: Photo by Sara Jaye Weiss/REX/Shutterstock (5712409u) Demi Lovato 102.7 KIIS FM'S Wango Tango, Backstage Portrait Studio, Carson, America - 14 May 2016

Demi Lovato (Dallas, TX)

Best Pop Vocal Album: Confident


solange

Solange (Houston, TX)

Best R&B Performance: Cranes In The Sky


miranda lambert

Miranda Lambert (Longview, TX)

Best Country Solo Performance: Vice

Best Country Song: Vice


PTX2016

Pentatonix (Arlington, TX)

Best Country/Due Group Performance: Jolene (feat. Dolly Parton)


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Tamela Mann (Fort Worth, TX)

Best Gospel Performance/Song: God Provides


kirk franklin

Kirk Franklin (Fort Worth, TX)

Best Gospel Album: Losing My Religion


crowder

David Crowder (Texarkana, TX)

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album: American Prodigal


Sarah Jarosz, Americana, country and folk singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, in London on 21st March, 2011. (Photo by Jon Lusk/Redferns)

Sarah Jarosz (Austin, TX)

Best American Roots Performance: House of Mercy, from Undercurrent

Best Folk Album: Undercurrent


Kris-Kristofferson1

Kris Kristofferson (Brownsville, TX)

Best Americana Album: The Cedar Creek Sessions

Our Favorite Songs Of 2016

Features

Our Favorite Songs Of 2016

Posted by on Nov 30, 2016

Thanks for everything 2016. To say you were a wild, emotional roller coaster of year would be an understatement. But, one thing that can’t be overstated enough is the fact that good music can help keep the wheels on the tracks… and man was there some GREAT music this year. From our playlist to yours, here are some of our favorite songs from 2016.

Scroll down to the bottom for a playlist of all our picks for 2016!



 

Rick McNulty – Host of Fri. “Left of the Dial” & Sat. 7p-11p

Nick Waterhouse – “Katchi”

Apparently “katchi” is the kind of massage you receive from a loved one. The groove and melody is so amazingly catchy and yet so basic; you know it’s gonna hook you the moment you hear it. My favorite part is that it sounds like it was recorded in 1957 at Cosimo Matassa’s tiny little studio off the back of his family’s grocery on Rampart Street in New Orleans. Like everything he recorded there, it’s rudimentary but timelessly classic.

Chris Forsyth & The Solar Motel Band – “High Castle Rock”

GUITARS! GUITARS! GUITARS! This might be my favorite instrumental of all time, and that’s saying something. It’s a glorious feast of swirling GUITARS and they’re absolutely unstoppable news-15-12-chris-forsythuntil they land with a mighty crash ten minutes later. Imagine a breathtaking instrumental version of “Marquee Moon” – it’s that good. If you dig GUITARS in the slightest, this one’s for you.

Wild Beasts – “Big Cat”

This is my favorite “pop” song of the year. Structurally it couldn’t be simpler and it’s no more than four notes and yet I can’t escape singing along with the hook: “big cat, top of the food chain/you can look/but don’t touch.” Maybe it’s about a dominatrix or a naughty house cat – they both make you feel small and unworthy – but in any case I’m ready to remove the collar.

The Lemon Twigs – “These Words”

I vividly remember the moment we heard this track in our weekly music meeting. We fell off our chairs laughing, not quite sure if it was an elaborate joke. Then we listened to it again and stopped laughing. The two twigs threw in the whole kitchen sink: Brian Wilson, Todd Rundgren, Dr. Dog, and ‘70s sitcom themes. It’s a head spinner, a tickler, a mini-masterpiece. I can see the Lemon Twigs sailing the waterway as the new champions of yacht rock.

Whitney – “No Matter Where We Go”

I’m a sucker for a song that mentions riding around with the windows down and this one has it in spades. This is a perfect slice of guitar pop that sounds like it was recorded in a teenager’s dingy bedroom. It’s as if Big Star rewrote “Earn Enough For Us,” which is to say that it combines the sugar of British pop with the spice of American determination. The fact that they’re from Chicago makes it a little more special.

 

Jody Denberg – Host M-Th 5p-8p, Fri. 12p-4p

Alejandro Escovedo – “Heartbeat Smile”

Catchy first single from the new “Burn Something Beautiful”. This songwriting and production collaboration with Peter Buck and Scott McCaughey rocks in a T. Rex style sweetened by the poppy backing vocals of Kelly Hogan. Looking forward to their forthcoming episode of “Austin City Limits” as who knows how often this gang will get together in the same room. Following three fruitful collaborations with Bowie producer Tony Visconti this is a nice change-up but still in the same ballpark.

Case/Lang/Veirs – “Atomic Number”

On paper this trio didn’t inspire my anticipation, but this amazing song exceeded any expectations. It took a few times for this gem from Neko, k.d. and Laura to sink in, but once it did it was earworm-city. “Latin words across my heart/symbols of infinity” – this lyric is now tattooed in my DNA. It’s a good thing.lazarus art

David Bowie – “Lazarus”

What can one say? 2016 started out with the release of the “Black Star” album and then we lost Mr. Bowie two days later. Things haven’t gotten better since. Hard to pick a favorite from this brilliant swan song album, but “Lazarus” is as good as any. And that’s saying something. And that video….whew.

Corinne Bailey Rae – “Been To The Moon”

The third release from this British songbird didn’t disappoint, but this song is the standout. If you’ve read about Corinne’s trials and triumphs it gives “Been To The Moon” that much more resonance. Otherworldly yet rooted in human concerns, this song gets extra points for her incredible performance of it in Studio 1A prior to her ACL Festival appearances.

Blood Orange – “EVP”

OK, so I know Blood Orange is a gent named Dev Hynes, born in Texas but raised in the UK. And he recorded for years as Lightspeed Champion. Other than that the rest is a mystery, and sometimes I need to let the mystery be. Soul and funk from the future in the now, and something to tide us over til D’Angelo’s next album comes (if and when). And I don’t know what “EVP” is, either. Time to shut up and groove.

 

Matt Reilly – Program Director

Hayes Carll – “Sake of the Song”

This is such a well written song about the life of a touring musician and all that goes with it.

Car Seat Headrest – “Vincent”car seat headrest This one puts me into rock mode. It’s like old Strokes, but with more energy. The long version is worth 7+ minutes of your time.

Deap Valley – “Smile More”

As the father of a strong willed daughter, this song gives me hope. It is an excellent anthem for strong women and the men around them.

Bright Light Social Hour/Israel Nash – “Lupita”

This is such an earworm. It’s got that easy going Laurel Canyon vibe that makes everything seem OK.

Blood Orange – “E.V.P.”

This has a Quincy Jones/Prince feel to it that makes it instantly relatable and a ton of fun to listen to. Plus the British accent makes it smarter.

 

 

Michael Crockett, host of “Horizontes, Music of Latin America” Sun. 7p-11p

“Arde” by La Yegros (Argentina)la yegros

Argentinian singer Mariana Yegros  is joined by Brazilian Girls’ singer Sabina Sciubba and the horns of Colombian band Puerto Candelaria on the this electrocumbia track from the album Magnetismo, easily my favorite album of the year.

“Mufete” by Emicida (Brazil)

Brazilian rapper Emicida recorded his latest album in Africa, mostly in Angola and Cape Verde, which like Brazil, are former Portuguese colonies.  This song pays homage to Angola’s capital, Luanda, and is named for a favorite fish dish consumed there.

“Te Quiero Con Bugalú” by Ilé (Puerto Rico)

Ilé aka Ileana Cabra, is the younger sister of and has often performed with the hip-hop duo Calle 13. She takes a decidedly different direction though on her debut album Ilevitable and sings in retro styles like bolero and on this song, bugalú, the Latin/R&B dance music of the 1960s.

“Cantaré Para Vos” by La Mambanegra (Colombia)

A slow-building salsa groove from this Cali, Colombia band’s debut EP La Galería starts with a muted trumpet, guitar and vocals and ends with a full chorus and horn section.   

“Luchín” by Ana Tijoux (Chile)

Beautiful urban/jazz remake of a song by famous Chilean folk singer and political activist, Victor Jara.  The song was released this year on 9/11, a date also remembered in Chile as the anniversary of a 1973 military coup that led to the torture and death of Jara and many other activists as well as a decade of dictatorship.

 

 

Jeff McCord – KUTX Music Director, Host Fri. 6a-9a

Chance The Rapper ft. Knox Fortune – “All Night”
Chance’s ‘Coloring Book’ detours into spiritual areas less traveled in hip-hop. Yet like Anderson .Paak’s “Come Down”, “All Night” is a bit of a comic outlier, seemingly about being unable to get a drunk friend out of his car. It’s also possesses a funny, a biting edge so lacking in a lot of present day indie rock.
White Denim – “Holda You (I’m Psycho)white denim
Strong stuff. The lyrics are possessive and outright scary (see the subtitle) but wrapped in a indelible four minute slab of furious funk rock, from a band who doesn’t know how to do anything halfway.
Car Seat Headrest ‘ “Drunk Driver/Killer Whales
Behind Will Toledo’s ridiculous nom de plume is a writer of real insight (though I gotta admit the ‘killer while ‘ analogy here eludes me). Still, this is powerful work  about responsibility, acceptance and a real struggle to get things right   (”We are not a proud race/It’s not a race at all/We’re just trying/I’m only trying to get home”). Its musings and a monster hooks will stay with you, like it or not.
Kevin Morby – “Singing Saw” 
The title track from one of the year’s best albums. This Lubbock songwriter went through stylistic gyrations before arriving at his sound, and the seven minute-plus title track exemplifies it best –  emphatic, repetitious, and instilled with a quiet burn.
PJ Harvey – “River Anacostia”
Another unforgettable record for Harvey. Buried deep in her new album, this soulful, dirge is propelled by tribal drums and Harvey’s haunting wail. “What will become of us?” Good question, PJ.

Jacquie Fuller – Asst. Program Director

Radiohead – “Burn the Witch

It’s not that I don’t like Radiohead, I just sort of lost interest in the band somewhere after Kid A. In the interim, though, I’ve spent the last several years admiring Jonny Greenwood’s tense, agoraphobia-inducing film scores, which – along with an intense election year – prepped me for the shrill orchestration of “Burn the Witch.” When Thom Yorke sings, “This is a low-flying panic attack,” form follows function. I feel this song in my bones.

 Whitney – “No Woman”

Late summer and autumn were my favorite seasons when I was a kid – each new school year signaled a certain promise. As an adult, though, they’re tinged with a little sadness, as every trip round the sun reminds me that I’m a little closer to death. “No Woman” evokes all the 110-film glow of seasons past, but it’s got an undercurrent of something aware and worn. It’s lo-fi but refreshingly not throwback.

 Grupo Fantasma – “Porque”grupocover1500x1500

You know how when you finally meet that special someone, it’s like everyone you ever dated before ceases to exist for you? My apologies to The Fab Four, but “Because” should have always been this silky bolero. #sorrynotsorry

 Car Seat Headrest – “Fill in the Blank”  

Will Toledo was born the year I graduated high school, and he’s already on his thirteenth album as Car Seat Headrest. There are a lot of tracks to love on Teens of Denial, but the opener is still my favorite – evoking early Superchunk, Guided By Voices, The Strokes, and the totality of my youth in general. As I tweeted while watching CSH play at Sound on Sound Fest, “I’d be proud if I was his mom.” (To which his mom responded: “I’m his mom and I’m very proud.”)

 Beyoncé – “Hold Up”  

The English Beat’s ska cover of Andy William’s “Can’t Get Used to Losing You” has been beloved to me since my teen years, as was Yeah Yeah Yeah’s “Maps” in college. “Hold Up” dips into both on a track that’s deceptively simple and plucks at the tenderest parts of me. Lyrically, I love the way this song makes space for all the conflicting emotions surrounding love/infidelity – yeah, you can still love somebody who’s wronged you. Nevertheless, the way Bey skips off Soulja Boy-style at the end feels downright victorious: self-preservation conquering heartache.


Katie Bradley – Host T & Th 7p-11p

Lizzo- Good as Hell
Anthem for getting over and getting on with your fine self. I am addicted to the upbeat hook and her words for pushing yourself out the door to drink up what potential you forgot you got. Make this your alarm, every day, start with a dose of confidence.
Nina Diaz – January 9th
This song is such a tease, it starts as a soft plead for understanding and builds to a no hold barred unforgiving soul charged belting of an empowered women’s confessional. I lose it when those punk roots coat her vocal howls.
A Giant Dog – Rock and Rollgiant dog
Things can be simple if you just give yourself to rock and roll! A slight soft mosh it still suffices as a banger and I would happily listen to Sabrina Ellis sing the phone book, er Facebook ads? They pull off far out and glam spectacular all in just over two minutes.
De La Soul – Pain
That first bass beat gets me in an instant shuffle, when the back vocals come in “Pain won’t make it better/Tell me how you feel/Look over your shoulder/Time will make it real” For me, this was much need De la Soul in a much need time for understanding in a tough year like 2016. It’s a smooth groove and a reminder, we’re not alone in our pain. Featuring Snoop Dogg is just like slathering the butter on the bread.
Blood Orange/Empress Of –  Best to You
Whoa. Was I out of the loop. This was my introduction to both artists. Empress Of has a voice like an ice angel exhale and Dev Hynes is tapped into some serious other worldly eclecticism to create something completely new and different that sounds like I missed it a decade before. I stop to think but my body doesn’t keeps moving. Everytime I listen to this song there is a new elemnt that reveals itself to me that I hadn’t noticed or gave weight before. This is music as art. High brow stuff.

Elizabeth McQueen – Producer/Host of This Song podcast, On-Air host Sat. 10a-2p

Beyoncé – “Pray You Catch Me” 

Do you really want me to pick one track from Lemonade?   Well honestly I can’t. But I’ll choose the first track off this amazing piece of art because it signals, from the first note, that Beyonce is trying to do something different. Something expansive. And what follows is the best work in any genre or medium of 2016. 

 Lizzo — “Good As Hell” FNw7US0h

Lizzo is a hope bringer and a fear conquerer. I’m thankful for her and I’m thankful for this song which makes me see the light in the darkest of rooms.

 Third Root – “Soul Force” (feat Da’Shade, Riders Against the Storm, Bavu Blakes, Vocab)

 We just started playing this at KUTX and I can’t get enough of it.  It featured some of the best rappers in Austin backed up by Adrian Quesada’s production and it makes we want to dance and do the right thing.

 Big Thief — “Paul”

Adrienne’s voice gives me to chills and I feel a connection to all humanity when I hear this melancholy masterpiece.

 Angel Olsen — “Shut Up Kiss Me”

Angell Olsen made a pivot into lo-fi rock and I love it.  I fell down a hole with this one and ended up having learn the drum part before my soul would let me rest.

 


Art Levy – Song of the Day/My KUTX Producer, Host Sun. 10a-2p

Angel Olsen – “Shut Up Kiss Me”
Simple, and already classic-sounding, like Stevie Nicks screaming her way through a garage band. A love song that’s utterly, completely necessary.

Frank Ocean – “Solo”blonde

Modern gospel: “In hell, in hell there’s heaven.”

Radiohead – “Identikit”

More modern gospel: “Broken hearts make it rain.”

Anderson .Paak – “Am I Wrong” (feat. Schoolboy Q)
2016’s MVP provides the most smiles-per-second with this electro/funk/soul smash-up.
Beyonce – “Hold Up”
Lost Bowie and Prince, but the Queen is taking up the mantle of shape-shifting mass appeal.

 

 

Jay Trachtenberg – Host M-Th 12p-2p

Anderson Paak / Come Down

Irresistible hip hop/r&b from this Dr. Dre “discovery” and one of the breakout artists of 2016haelos

The Wind & The Wave / Grand Canyon

Propulsive tune from this alt-country Austin duo of Patty Lynn and Dwight Baker……from their sophomore release, Happiness Is Not a Place

De La Soul (w/Snoop Dogg) / Pain

The slinky groove and laidback vocals are reminiscent, to these ears, of Sly & The Family Stone.  From the first album in over a decade by these hip hop legends

Phosphorescent (w/Jenny Lewis) / Sugaree

Part of the 50+-track Grateful Dead tribute, Day Of The Dead, Matthew Houck aka Phosphorescent, turns this melancholy, mid-tempo Jerry Garcia gem into a spirited shuffle

Haelos / Dust

This London band channels the sound and spirit of mid-90s Trip Hop for  21st century sensibilities

 

 

Jack Anderson – Host M&ampTue 8p-11p

Kishi Bashi – “Say Yeah”

The flute. The flute. The flute is on fire. Everything prior to that heavenly flute solo is a good mix of contemporary production with vintage-sounding songwriting. All it’s missing is Marvin Gaye and Donald Byrd.

Third Root – “Soul Force”14581384_1230943853624251_5771076272914607295_n

The penultimate track on Libertad brings local mainstays Riders Against the Storm and Bavu Blakes as well as Da’Shade onto this San Antonio conscious hip hop collective. The title says it all – there’s no excuse to not to bob your head.

Hard Proof – “Revenge”

My favorite afrobeat group in town brings a healthy dose of mixed meter rhythms to the brass arrangement on Public Hi-Fi Sessions 03. Turn it up to 11 on Saturday night and take revenge on your work week.

Miike Snow – “My Trigger”

The first time I heard the piano riff from “Fruitman” by Kool & the Gang sampled elsewhere was on J Dilla’s “The Diff’rence” – a personal favorite – so this one gained immediate points within the first few moments. While Dilla may have beat the Swedes to the sample, Miike Snow brings a lot of pop energy to this reimagining of that Kool & the Gang loop, especially with the addition of those pitched up vocal chops in the chorus.

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats – “Shake”

Southern seduction in a nutshell. ‘Nuff said.

 

Taylor Wallace – Host Sat. 2p-6p

Weezer – “L.A. Girlz”

Weezer’s eponymous White Album is the group’s first in almost 20 years where every track could be a hit. “L.A. Girlz” is one of two tracks on this album co-written by lead guitarist Brian Bell, with frontman Rivers Cuomo taking his usual post as lyricist. It’s also possible I’m biased towards songs referencing Lewis Carroll poems.

Unknown Mortal Orchestra – “Shakedown Street”Thao-With-The-Get-Down-Stay-Down-A-Man-Alive

When you make a funky Grateful Dead tune even funkier, brilliance is achieved. 

Thao and the Get Down Stay Down – “Meticulous Bird”

Fun, funky, aggressive, feminist. We cannot be suffocated; we are meticulous birds of prey.

The Strokes – “Threat of Joy”

I’m a sucker for anything that sounds like it could be on Is This It?, and “Threat of Joy” is a paragon of that sound.

Santigold – “Big Boss, Big Time Business”

A lot of people prefer Bey’s Lemonade, but Santigold’s pro-fem-venom is what stokes my feminist fire.

Susan Castle – Host M-F 9a-12p

Warpaint – “New Song”

Who doesn’t love a love song, esp. one that’s a psychedelicized dance jam?  This all-girl LA band brings it live, too. 

Anderson .Paak – “Come Down”

Funky, R & B/hip-hop badassery.  

Chance the Rapper featuring Knox Fortune – “All Night”

Jazzy hip-hop happiness.  Start dancin’.

Blood Orange featuring Empress Of – “Best To You”

Love his beats. LOVE her voice. 

Nada Surf – “Cold To See Clear” 

Never really was much of a fan of this New York band, but this uplifting indie rocker hooked me. It hits all the right buttons for the pop music lover in me. 

Leonard Cohen 1934-2016

Features

Leonard Cohen 1934-2016

Posted by on Nov 11, 2016

Listen to Jody Denberg’s interviews with Leonard Cohen in the player at the bottom of this post. We’ve also included video of Leonard Cohen’s band performing at the Cactus Cafe before his final show in Austin at the Bass Concert Hall in 2012.

Writing about Leonard Cohen is an exercise in futility, because Leonard said it all and he said it better than anyone else. Cohen spoke and wrote with grace, wisdom, insight and humor. We lost so much with his passing November 10 at 82, but so much remains: the songs, the poems, the books, the knowledge imparted.

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Jody Denberg’s interview with Leonard Cohen for the October, 28th 1988 edition The Austin Chronicle

In Austin we had a special perch from which to view Leonard, because since the 1970s he employed wonderful local musicians to bring his songs to life, including his bassist and musical director Roscoe Beck, guitarist Mitch Watkins and other members of the Austin jazz-fusion outfit Passenger. They played here often.

 

His 1988 Austin City Limits episode – taped on Halloween night no less – remains one of the show’s standout moments in its 40+ year history (he also recorded an episode in 1993). And his Austin concerts – at the Opera House, the Backyard, the Long Center, Bass Concert Hall – were truly transcendent performances, second to none. Those who attended can attest to his nimbleness even as his age increased (including his skipping off of the stage to close his shows).

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Jody Denberg’s interview with Leonard Cohen for the October, 28th 1988 edition The Austin Chronicle

I had the opportunity to interview Leonard Cohen twice – in 1988 and 1993, conversations that aired on Austin radio and were also printed in The Austin Chronicle (audio from both is posted below).

In 1988, after giving a publicist my contact phone numbers, she mistakenly gave Cohen my home digits to call so we could tape our interview (instead of my work studio number). Imagine picking up your phone to hear the deep tones of Leonard asking for you. I knew who it was immediately from the kind, bass voice, and rescheduled our talk. I hung up the phone and stared at it, knowing it was a moment I would always remember. And who, shall I say, is calling?

 

Leonard Cohen 1993 Los AngelesThe night before Leonard Cohen’s two final Austin shows, his band assembled at the Cactus Cafe for an episode of “Views And Brews,” a live discussion forum. Their affection for Leonard was palpable as they performed his songs without him while he rested for his gigs (see the video below). Also present was Sylvie Simmons, whose “I’m Your Man: The Life Of Leonard Cohen” stands as his definitive biography.

It is a privilege to have lived during Leonard Cohen’s lifetime, to have had his work as a guiding light.

Ring the bells that still can ring….Take this waltz. It’s yours now.

It’s all that there is.

 

mail to jody edit

From Leonard Cohen to Jody Denberg

 

 

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Jody’s signed copy of Leonard Cohen’s The Future

 

 

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Book of poetry Leonard Cohen sent to Jody Denberg

 

 

 

 

 

Letters from a Milkman

Features

Letters from a Milkman

Posted by on Nov 9, 2016
Photo: Patrick Watson

Photo: Patrick Watson

This is a picture of my friend Mikey, snapping a photo from side-stage as the Dead Milkmen played at Sound on Sound Fest this past weekend. If you didn’t know Mikey, you might think, “Who’s that guy, and how’d he get to sit side stage while I’m out here in the crowd?” (Which is what I usually think every time I see someone watching a band from side-stage.) But how Mikey got that sweet spot is an equally sweet story.

I’ve known Mikey for nearly 20 years, from my days in my hometown of San Antonio. Mikey’s also an accomplished turntablist who performs mash-ups under the name DJ Jester the Filipino Fist (he performed in Studio 1A back in September.) Full disclosure: I wrote the liner notes to DJ Jester’s 2006 album, Secret Love. But this story isn’t about DJ Jester, though it certainly intersects with him. This is about Mike Pendon, the guy behind Jester, who was once a music-loving thirteen-year-old.

Mikey grew up in a small town outside of Houston. As a kid in the ‘80s, he was into the fringe kind of music that one had to search hard for, or learn about from older kids or record store clerks. He definitely had company – me, and maybe Win Butler, and lots of other suburban Texas kids listening to underground music back then – but didn’t know it. One day, on a school trip, a girl seated next to him on a plane saw Mikey’s Butthole Surfers cassette in his Walkman (a band, incidentally, formed in San Antonio), and told him he should check out the Dead Milkmen. So Mikey did. He bought all their tapes at Sam Goody, and listened to them on repeat. He saw an address in the liner notes of Beelzebubba, and sent a letter to the band. Like kids do.

But then he got a letter back. And another. And another.tumblr_msz6v3KyZg1spzde2o1_1280

Joe Jack Talcum of the Dead Milkmen and Mikey Pendon became pen pals, and corresponded from the time Mikey was thirteen until he was a sophomore in college (around when email became popular.) Eventually, Joe and Mikey stopped writing letters to each other, though from time to time, they’d exchange e-mails and songs. In 2008, the Dead Milkmen reunited at Fun Fun Fun Fest and Mikey contacted Joe to set up an after-party at Beerland. In 2010, DJ Jester joined Joe on tour.

Three years ago, Mikey began posting his letters from Joe on a Tumblr blog called Letters from a Milkman. The blog features pages and pages of letters, tour photos, even a Christmas card from Joe. “I’ve always had these letters with me,” Mikey told me by email. “These letters are probably one of my most-prized possessions. Like those years when I moved to San Francisco and most of my stuff was in storage – I basically moved there with these letters, my turntables, and clothes.” The letters span a huge chunk of Mikey’s development, and he calls them “the ultimate #tbt.” He doesn’t know exactly what he wrote to Joe, and while Joe admitted to not keeping Mikey’s letters to him, he does keep up with Mikey’s blog. “I suppose it would be even better,” Joe told him once by email, “if I could post scans of the letters you sent to me in the comments. But I am not entirely sure I still have them.”

I ran into Mikey in the media area at Sound on Sound, just a couple hours after the Dead Milkmen set. He pointed to where the band was hanging out, just a few feet away. “There’s the Dead Milkmen,” he laughed. “Just hanging out!” Here was a guy who had toured the country with his hero, and who had opening slots for bands like Of Montreal and Arcade Fire on his DJ resume, but I could hear the boyish excitement in his voice. In the presence of Joe and his band-mates, a part of Mikey would always be that thirteen-year-old kid, opening the mail to find another letter from a Milkman.

– Jacquie Fuller, Assistant Program Director, KUTX