International Women’s Day 2020

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International Women’s Day 2020

Posted by on Feb 3, 2020

March 8 is International Women’s Day – a worldwide day of recognition and action for women and girls. KUTX is participating in the best way we know how: with music!

For four years now, KUTX has celebrated this annual event with special programming, curated by the women of KUTX. (We were even recognized for our efforts last year by the organizers of International Women’s Day!)

Join the ladies of KUTX again this year on Sunday, March 8. Starting at 7 A.M., we’ll shine the spotlight on women – from singer-songwriters, to kick-ass frontwomen, to rappers  – from here in Austin and around the world. (We can’t promise you won’t hear some men singing – how else do we honor awesome lady drummers and guitarists?!)

What’s more – we’re kicking the men out of the studio from 7 A.M. until 6 P.M., after which our male-hosted specialty shows will keep the celebration going by featuring all female artists on their shows.

Be sure to follow along on Instagram (@KUTX), too, for stories and portraits celebrating women in music.

Schedule:

7-10 A.M. – All-female Sunday Morning Jazz with Rebecca McInroy
10 A.M. – 12 P.M. – KUTX all-female music mix with Elizabeth McQueen
12-2 P.M. – KUTX all-female music mix with Miles Bloxon
2-4 P.M. – KUTX all-female music mix with Laurie Gallardo
4-6 P.M. – KUTX all-female music mix with Taylor Wallace
6-7 P.M. – All-female Spare the Rock, Spoil the Child with host Bill Childs
7-11 P.M. – All-female Horizontes with host Michael Crockett
11-11:59 P.M. – All-female World Music with host Hayes McCauley

International Women’s Day (#IWD2020) is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity. Join the 2020 Campaign: #eachforequal. See more Austin events here.

 

Why Texas Music Legend Terry Allen Calls His New Album ‘Just Like Moby Dick’

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Why Texas Music Legend Terry Allen Calls His New Album ‘Just Like Moby Dick’

Posted by on Jan 29, 2020
Daniel Johnston Mural Unveiled At Austin Central Library

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Daniel Johnston Mural Unveiled At Austin Central Library

Posted by on Jan 22, 2020
KUTX Holiday Mix Dec. 21-25

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KUTX Holiday Mix Dec. 21-25

Posted by on Dec 15, 2019

Holiday music is ubiquitous. Our turkey dinners have barely had time to digest before we start hearing it everywhere. These days, it seems you can’t buy groceries or a giant television without your ears being assaulted by the forced cheer of Mariah Carey or the Trans-Siberian Orchestra. Hey – let it be known that we’ve got nothing against either – but here at KUTX, we strive to bring you a holiday mix that’s more in line with what you normally hear on our airwaves.

Prefer to spend the holidays with the likes of The Shins, XTC, The Pretenders, Willie Nelson, Heartless Bastards, Aimee Mann, and Johnny Cash? Then spend the holidays with KUTX. Beginning December 21st at 6 A.M., KUTX will go wall-to-wall holiday music, without the cheese (unless it’s, you know, ironic cheese. We like that flavor.) And we’ll keep at it until 11 P.M. on December 25th.

Tune in to KUTX starting at 6 A.M. on December 21. Heading out of town for the holidays? You can stream our holiday mix from anywhere in the world, and view the playlist, too.

It’s our way of saying Happy Holidays! (And it also might be our way of getting a few days off work.)

5 Questions with Jay Trachtenberg

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5 Questions with Jay Trachtenberg

Posted by on Dec 2, 2019

Longtime music host Jay Trachtenberg has been with the station for 32 years (for KUT 90.5 before music moved to KUTX 98.9 in 2013), spinning everything from jazz, to reggae, to rock and everything in between.

When he’s not on the air, he’s managing KUTX air staff, producing the weekly on-air schedule and helping manage the many ticket giveaways each week. Jay also writes about music for the “Austin Chronicle” from time to time.

Five Questions with KUTX Music Host Jay Trachtenberg

What musical experience most set you on the path to a career in radio?

I’ve always had a fascination with radio. As a young kid, I would stay up late falling asleep with one those little Japanese transistor radios plugged into my ear. Later I would try to tune into any number of top-of-the-dial, high-powered stations after midnight from my home in Los Angeles. When the weather conditions were just right I could pick up stations in Shreveport, Nashville or Oklahoma City. I would often listen to Wolfman Jack late at night on XERF and XERB blasting out of Rosarita, Mexico, just south of the border.

During the 1960s I was enthralled by Top 40 jocks like The Real Don Steele and then “underground” DJs like Humble Harve Miller, B. Mitchell Reed and Jimmy Rabbit (from the David Allan Coe classic, “Long Haired Redneck”). As soon as I got the opportunity, I signed up at my college station, KCSB, at the University of California at Santa Barbara – and the rest is history, as they say.

What’s your favorite Austin music experience so far?

After being in Austin for almost 40 years, it’s hard to pick a single event. But one that makes for a good story was the time I interviewed Jesse Colin Young back in 2004 in our old Studio 1A.  

Way back in the day he had been in the Youngbloods, a band that had a big hit with “Get Together” – “Come on all you people now, smile on your brother, everybody get together, try to love one another right now.” It was a real anthem of the 1960s.

So Mr. Young ends his live Studio 1A session with this song and while he’s singing it, I flash back to a huge anti-Vietnam War demonstration in San Francisco in 1969 where I’m one of a half million people in Golden Gate Park and the Youngbloods are singing this popular song of peace and love. Here I am – 35 years later – in Studio 1A with Jesse Colin Young sitting 10 feet away and he’s singing this same song to me. Chills ran down my spine. Who’d of ever thunk??  

Why public rather than commercial radio?

In a nutshell, public radio treats its listeners as thoughtful, intelligent citizens while commercial radio tends to treat its listeners as mindless, voracious consumers.

How do you spend your time when you’re not spinning records on the air?

Reading, swimming and running, working in my garden, strolling in the park with my girlfriend and her dog, and going out to hear live music.

Finish the sentence: “Austin Music Is ….”

… a direct reflection of what makes this such an exceptionally creative and special place to live.


 Jay hosts music from noon to 2 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays. He hosts a jazz show Sunday mornings from 7 to 10.

Say hi to Jay on Twitter @jjtrachtenberg