Best Songs Ever… 11.15.19

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Best Songs Ever… 11.15.19

Posted by on Nov 15, 2019
Photos from left to right – (Molly Sarlé, Cherry Glazerr, Frances Cone)
KUTX’s Susan Castle spills the beans on the BEST SONGS EVER! At least for this week.

Molly Sarlé – “Human”

First up, music from Molly Sarlé. She’s part of the trio Mountain Man and made her solo debut this fall with Karaoke AngelAs she said during her Studio 1A live performance recently, her songs are less “verse-chorus-verse” and more like “words that just tumble out of darkness.” Her expressive voice won some fans when she opened up for Wilco’s two sold-out nights a few weeks back and will be back in Austin in February for a Valentine’s Day show at the Mohawk. Here’s Molly Sarlé with “Human.”

Cherry Glazerr – “Call Me”

Next, Cherry Glazerr is a band from LA that started as a solo project for vocalist and guitarist Clementine Creevy.  The band takes its name from the NPR reporter Chery Glaser, but with a little twist. The group has had a number of lineup changes since its inception and just dropped a new collaboration with Portugal The Man.  This is Cherry Glazerr with “Call Me.”

 

Frances Cone – “Failure”

Our last song is by Frances Cone, the indie folk pop duo of pianist Christine Cone and her musical & life partner, bassist/singer Andrew Doherty. They first got together in Brooklyn, but are now living in Nashville and making modern atmospheric pop. From their second full length album, Late Riser, this is “Failure.”

Levitation Pop-Up Sessions

Features

Levitation Pop-Up Sessions

Posted by on Nov 14, 2019

Levitation rolled through Austin November 7-10 and to get in on the action we invited a few performers to KUTX producer Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon’s house to record a pop-up session. Scroll through to get the goods and stay tuned to KUTX to hear these same songs on-air!










Best Songs Ever…11.01.19

Features

Best Songs Ever…11.01.19

Posted by on Oct 30, 2019
Photos from left to right – (Dan Snaith, Sabrina Ellis from A Giant Dog, Angel Olsen)
KUTX Host Art Levy spills the beans on the BEST SONGS EVER! At least for this week.

Caribou- “Home”
After five long years, one of my personal favorite artists is finally back with some new music. Dan Snaith, better known as Caribou, really has a knack for making electronic music that’s organic and emotional, and this new song really packs a punch. Here’s “Home” by Caribou.

A Giant Dog- “Black Mirror”
Up next, Austin’s A Giant Dog covering Arcade Fire. I know, right? Where did this come from? Merge Records, which has served as the label for both A Giant Dog and Arcade Fire, turns 30 years old this year, and they asked some of their artists to cover full albums as a celebration of Merge’s catalog. A Giant Dog puts a punk rock spin on Arcade Fire’s 2007 album Neon Bible, and it rules. It shows what great songwriters Arcade Fire has, and what an incredible band A Giant Dog truly is. Here they are covering “Black Mirror.”

Angel Olsen-“What It Is”
Finally, new music from Angel Olsen. On her album All Mirrors, Olsen has blown up her sound to epic proportions. Composer Jherek Bischoff adds these incredible string arrangements to Olsen’s songs, making them sound both classic and futuristic. You can see Olsen at Stubb’s next Thursday as part of Levitation Fest, and here’s “What It Is” by Angel Olsen.
Best Songs Ever. . .10.11.19

Features

Best Songs Ever. . .10.11.19

Posted by on Oct 10, 2019
Photos from left to right – (Ley Line, Bedouine, Preservation Hall Jazz Band)
KUTX Host Jody Denberg spills the beans on the BEST SONGS EVER! At least for this week.

Ley Line – “Oxum”
Austin’s Ley Line is the KUTX Artist Of The Month for October. On “Oxum”–from their forthcoming album We Saw Blue, out in 2020–the quartet weaves together the cultures of Austin and Brazil. Ley Line plays ACL Fest on Sunday at 12:45 p.m.

Bedouine – “Dizzy”
Bedouine is a Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter of Syrian-American heritage. Her given name is Azniv Korkejian, and her second album, Bird Songs Of A Killjoy, is out now. “Dizzy” features the orchestral production work of Spacebomb Records, from Richmond, Virginia.

Preservation Hall Jazz Band – “Keep Your Head Up”
And finally, “Keep Your Head Up” from the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, who have been making great music since the early 1960s. Their latest, A Tuba To Cuba, is a fusion of New Orleans and Cuban music, and there’s a documentary of the same name that covers the making of the album.
Best Songs Ever…10.4.19

Features

Best Songs Ever…10.4.19

Posted by on Oct 3, 2019
Photos from left to right – (Shura, Billie Eilish, Jay Som)
KUTX Host Taylor Wallace spills the beans on the BEST SONGS EVER! At least for this week.

Shura – “Forever”
Let’s start with a couple of women playing ACL Fest this weekend. First, British singer Shura, who’s sound is best classified as 90s vintage pop. Imagine some of your favorite early Mariah Carey songs, but they’re about kissing and having long-night, flirty phone calls with other girls. Don’t dismiss it as just being pop though. There’s a lot going on in her multi-layered sound. You can see Shura at both weekends of ACL Fest and on the new Bonus Tracks stage recording an episode of our podcast This Song. Here she is with “Forever.”

Billie Eilish – “bury a friend”
Full transparency: I never thought I’d be personally lauding this next artist, but hey, you’re never too cool to appreciate a good song. Billie Eilish is one of the biggest pop stars in the world right now, having recently graced the cover of Rolling Stone. Slick, morbid, and studded with just the right amount bass, this song sweetly showcases the songwriting team of Billie and her brother Finneas O’Connell. Also playing both weekends of ACL Fest, here’s Billie Eilish with “bury a friend.”

 


Jay Som – “Superbike”
And from L.A.’s A-list to its underground, this last song is by an artist I’ve been falling in love with for years. Melina Mae Duterte is the brain behind bedroom-pop outfit Jay Som. The new album, Anak Ko, is the first Duterte recorded with a full band. “Superbike” has catchy hooks, dreamy harmonies, and its lo-fi lean emphatically epitomizes the album’s hazy mood.