James Hand @ KUTX 02.09.2015

Studio 1A Sessions

James Hand @ KUTX 02.09.2015

Posted by on Jun 9, 2020

Texas country musician and local legend James Hand has been making music for over forty years.

Writing songs since the early age of 11 and performing almost continuously for years, James Hand started releasing music in 1999. However, having released his first nationally distributed album only in 2006, the Waco-native has just recently started garnering widespread attention for his unique and direct style. His last album, Stormclouds in Heaven, a collection of country gospel songs, was released in October 2014 and demonstrates a command of the breadth of the genre. Interestingly, Hand also had a leading role in the film Thank You A Lot about a struggling music-manager and his estranged father, which premiered at SXSW this past year.

You can catch James Hand’s live performances at the Paramount Theater on February 17th and at Hole in the Wall on the February 18th, or stream his music here on KUTX.

Jay Trachtenberg

KUTX Staff

Jay Trachtenberg

Posted by on Dec 16, 2019

Host: M-Th 12-2p/Su 7-10a


What musical experience most set you on the path to a career in radio?

I’ve always had a fascination with radio. As a young kid, I would stay up late falling asleep with one those little Japanese transistor radios plugged into my ear. Later I would try to tune into any number of top-of-the-dial, high-powered stations after midnight from my home in Los Angeles. When the weather conditions were just right I could pick up stations in Shreveport, Nashville or Oklahoma City. I would often listen to Wolfman Jack late at night on XERF and XERB blasting out of Rosarita, Mexico, just south of the border.

During the 1960s I was enthralled by Top 40 jocks like The Real Don Steele and then “underground” DJs like Humble Harve MillerB. Mitchell Reed and Jimmy Rabbit (from the David Allan Coe classic, “Long Haired Redneck”). As soon as I got the opportunity, I signed up at my college station, KCSB, at the University of California at Santa Barbara – and the rest is history, as they say.

What’s your favorite Austin music experience so far?

After being in Austin for almost 40 years, it’s hard to pick a single event. But one that makes for a good story was the time I interviewed Jesse Colin Young back in 2004 in our old Studio 1A.  

Way back in the day he had been in the Youngbloods, a band that had a big hit with “Get Together” – “Come on all you people now, smile on your brother, everybody get together, try to love one another right now.” It was a real anthem of the 1960s.

So Mr. Young ends his live Studio 1A session with this song and while he’s singing it, I flash back to a huge anti-Vietnam War demonstration in San Francisco in 1969 where I’m one of a half million people in Golden Gate Park and the Youngbloods are singing this popular song of peace and love. Here I am – 35 years later – in Studio 1A with Jesse Colin Young sitting 10 feet away and he’s singing this same song to me. Chills ran down my spine. Who’d of ever thunk??  

Why public rather than commercial radio?

In a nutshell, public radio treats its listeners as thoughtful, intelligent citizens while commercial radio tends to treat its listeners as mindless, voracious consumers.

How do you spend your time when you’re not spinning records on the air?

Reading, swimming and running, working in my garden, strolling in the park with my girlfriend and her dog, and going out to hear live music.

Finish the sentence: “Austin Music Is ….”

… a direct reflection of what makes this such an exceptionally creative and special place to live.

Rick McNulty

KUTX Staff

Rick McNulty

Posted by on Dec 16, 2019

Music Director & Host

Top Tracks of 2017


What musical experience most set you on the path to a career in radio?

I was around six years old and rifling through my parents’ records in the basement. I played my mom’s copy of Introducing The Beatles and had a bonafide religious experience. Nearly the same thing happened with my dad’s Creedence Clearwater LPs. Once I ran out of records to play, I reached for the radio to discover new music, much like I do now.

 

What’s your favorite Austin music experience so far?

The Tom Waits SXSW show at the Paramount in 1999 will never be topped, but one of my favorite memories was at another SXSW. I was at the Empanada Parlor on Dirty Sixth watching Grupo Fantasma for the first time and thought I had discovered the future of Austin music. I frantically called my friend who was watching the White Stripes across the street at Emo’s and convinced him to leave that show and join me. We’ve both been fans ever since.

 

Why public rather than commercial radio?

As a young man, I wanted nothing more than to host a radio program. I worked at my high school station and a few college stations, as well as other community radio outfits. By the time I graduated, I discovered that commercial stations didn’t let the disc jockey choose the songs they played. The idea of having no agency in what I could play was preposterous to me. Public radio saved my soul.

 

How do you spend your time when you’re not spinning records on the air?

When I’m not spinning records on the air, I’m spinning them at home. I collect rare vinyl, geek out on deadwax, and perform audio shootouts between various pressings. Besides the nerdy stuff, I like to read, curse, collect shoes and pretend I’m a bon vivant.

 

Finish the sentence: “Austin Music Is ….”

…as diverse as you can find in any city. For every garage and Americana band, there’s an equal amount of Afrobeat and Hip-Hop. On any given night, you can watch terrific music of any genre in just about any part of town. We’re lucky that Austin is still a magnet for creative and talented people and I’d like to think that KUTX helps in that regard.


KUTX Responsibilities

Left of the Dial

Other Work

RubyRico Productions

Michael Crockett

KUTX Staff

Michael Crockett

Posted by on Dec 12, 2019

Host Su 7-10p

Top Tracks of 2017


What musical experience most set you on the path to a career in radio?

Hearing “Horizontes” on KUT when I was a Latin American Studies student at UT in the ‘70s. I befriended the DJ, John Wheat, took a radio production class, and was allowed to be a substitute host from time to time. This eventually led to me becoming the new host in 1988.

 

What’s your favorite Austin music experience so far?

It’s hard to pick just one, but what immediately comes to mind was bringing my favorite Brazilian musician, Milton Nascimento, to the Paramount Theater in 1982.

 

Why public rather than commercial radio?

I’m a curator and host of a show about Latin music, much of it, but not all of it, probably considered “ non-commercial”; i.e., you won’t hear much of it commercial Latin music stations, so I’m thankful to have had a home here at public radio KUT/KUTX for 30 years.

 

How do you spend your time when you’re not spinning records on the air?

For many years I have worked in various other aspects of the music business. More recently, I am semi-retired and like to spend my weekdays at our cabin in the Hill Country and taking occasional trips abroad, including annual trips to my wife’s home country, Colombia.

 

Finish the sentence: “Austin Music Is ….”

…more diverse as the population has become more diverse and I have tried to reflect that in the Latin and World music programming I have created at KUT/KUTX. We have a healthy Latin music scene here that has produced some bands of world renown like Grammy winners Grupo Fantasma among others. You will almost always hear a local band in the mix on Horizontes.

Jeff McCord

KUTX Staff

Jeff McCord

Posted by on Dec 9, 2019

Music Director/Host: F 6a-9a

** Want to request a song from Jeff?  Every Friday at 7:30am Jeff plays song rarely, if ever, heard on the radio. It can be a song by a famous or unknown artist, new or old, the only requirement is that you don’t hear it on the radio that often. Email [email protected] if you have a song you’d like to hear.

Top Tracks of 2017


What musical experience most set you on the path to a career in radio?

I discovered music early – my father loved music and had a fairly open mind, at least about some things. I read every piece of music writing I could get my hands on, played music in high school bands, got into piano, and began acquiring albums at a furious pace. This was helped along by the fact that I was lucky enough to have some adventurous radio happening around me when I was growing up. I was fairly obsessed, and hearing creative people on the radio made me quickly realize its enormous potential. The first job I ever had – at age fifteen – was at a radio station.

 

What’s your favorite Austin music experience so far?

There have been so many. Early on seeing so many formative Austin giants, to playing and seeing other bands at Rauls, Club Foot, Liberty Lunch, the Beach, the Continental Club, all long gone save the Continental, to more recent local acts blowing the roof off newer venues like ABGB, Emos, the Mohawk (ok, no roof). Many great moments have come from our Studio 1A, both the old and the new one. I talked a friend into bringing Allen Toussaint by; sitting in the same room with him and many other lost legends are incredible memories. When I first got to Austin I was going out to see Austin musicians virtually every night and a great number of special musical nights have stayed with me over the years. Willie’s 60th birthday bash, with Bob Dylan and Ray Charles in attendance, stands out. One of the weirdest and most unusual events was a thing called Gloriathon, when Austin musicians from every musical spectrum tag teamed to play ‘Gloria’ for 24 hours to close down Liberty Lunch. Van Morrison even joined in the act over the phone from some festival in the UK. Simultaneously an absurd and powerful Austin music moment.

 

Why public rather than commercial radio?

Well, I’ve done both, but after enduring several buyouts and overnight format changes, I thought I was done with radio and its instability,and moved on to other things in the music business for several years. My friend Hayes McCauley convinced me to try KUT, and I’ve been around in one capacity or another since 1990. There are many good commercial stations, and this is an unfair generalization, but to me public radio has always been first and foremost about music, while commercial radio has other priorities.

 

How do you spend your time when you’re not spinning records on the air?

As music director I program new music for the station. When I’m not at work I’m often listening to things old and new, going to shows, and hanging out with my friends. We talk about many things, but it always comes down to – what else? – music.

 

Finish the sentence: “Austin Music Is ….”

…the lifeblood of this town and the reason I have lived here for over three decades.