Daniel Johnston Mural Unveiled At Austin Central Library

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Daniel Johnston Mural Unveiled At Austin Central Library

Posted by on Jan 22, 2020
Terry Allen & the Panhandle Mystery Band 1.17.20

Studio 1A Sessions

Terry Allen & the Panhandle Mystery Band 1.17.20

Posted by on Jan 22, 2020
photos by Gabriel C. Pérez/KUTX

With a new album, Just Like Moby Dick, scheduled for a January 24 release, a Grammy nomination, and a slew of art exhibitions in the works, 2020 is shaping up to be a banner year for Texas renaissance man and songwriting legend Terry Allen. Like his seminal albums Lubbock On Everything and Juarez, the new music stays true to Terry Allen’s special brand of delightfully wacky panhandle philosophy. To celebrate the new album Allen brought his all-star Panhandle Mystery Band to KUTX for a live broadcast with a studio audience.

Take a peek at the great videos from this session and listen to the full interview to hear Terry Allen talk about how scary it is to release new art, plus his plans for the ashes of longtime friend and collaborator Guy Clark.

The Panhandle Mystery Band is Shannon McNally (vocals), Davis McLarty (drums, vocals), Charlie Sexton (guitar), Bukka Allen (keys, accordion), Richard Bowden (fiddle, mandolin), and Lloyd Maines (pedal steel). 


Host: Jody Denberg
Audio Engineer: Cliff Hargrove, Jake Perlman
Producer: Deidre Gott
Cameras: Gabriel C. Pérez, Michael Minasi

The Andrew Cyrille Quartet

Caught

The Andrew Cyrille Quartet

Posted by on Jan 20, 2020
image courtesy of the artist

McCullough Theatre

1.17.20

by Jeff McCord

Maybe it’s because I was just reading an oral history of the HBO program The Wire, which took its time over five seasons telling an absorbing and complex story. Or maybe it’s just the frantic pace that has kicked off 2020. Whatever reason, the Friday performance by drummer Andrew Cyrille and his quartet (Ben Street on bass, David Virelles on keys and Bill Frisell on guitar) seemed to wash over the sold-out audience like a tonic. The eighty-year-old Cyrille, best known for his work with Cecil Taylor,  is enjoying a late-career renaissance. Live musical performances are often about building to peak moments. Most seasoned performers, including those in the modern jazz world, learn tricks and techniques to incite and involve the audience. Yet Cyrille and quartet seemed completely uninterested in that. For the most part, tempos stayed in the medium range. There were no hair-raising solos. Even with monstrous talents like Virelles and Frisell on stage, everything felt in service to the music. Cyrille’s six minute-plus drum solo in tribute to Art Blakey was more about melodicism than flash. It took a couple of songs, including a frantic Coltrane-penned opener,  to shake the rust off. But by the time the group hit its stride, on a transcendent reading of Julius Hemphill’s “The Painter”, it was clear what the evening held in store. Throughout the ninety-minute set, which included a mournful piece written by bassist Peter Dominguez about the indigenous Tsimsciam, a loose-limbed meditation by Cuban pianist Virelles translated as “Prayer”, and “Baby” a joyous Frisell composition, the band refrained from grandstanding. As a result, nothing drew attention away from the compositions (each of which Cyrille prefaced with lengthy contextual remarks). I was reminded of what Houston composer Pauline Oliveros termed “deep listening’. I found myself completely enveloped in the music. Of course, not everyone in the audience had the same feeling. There were numerous evacuees of the less patient between selections. And some of the season ticket holders didn’t show up at all. Jazz music, in these days of fewer recordings and sales, has become all about live performances. The magic happens on stage. There are no known recordings of this particular lineup of Cyrille’s quartet (well, by me, anyway). On nights like this, you want to capture this lightning-in-a-bottle and keep it with you, and plant all your absent music-loving friends in the empty seats. Instead, you’re left with fading memories. It’s always a sign you’ve been through something extraordinary when you’re sad that it has ended. I could have easily sat through another hour or two of this entrancing performance. Even slowed down and given room to breathe, music of this caliber can still leave you breathless.

Presented in partnership with KUTX’s Sunday Morning Jazz

(Andrew Cyrille returns to Austin on April 19th with Texas saxophonist Billy Harper at the North Door.)

…And You Will Know Us By The Trail of Dead 1.15.20

Studio 1A Sessions

…And You Will Know Us By The Trail of Dead 1.15.20

Posted by on Jan 16, 2020

photo by Michael Minasi/KUTX

We’re still picking up the pieces in Studio 1A after legendary Austin based rockers …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead stopped by to share some tunes of their new album, The Godless Void and Other Stories, out Friday, January 17. In addition to their visit to KUTX the band celebrated with a release show at the Far Out Lounge before packing up the gear and heading on the road for an extensive tour that take them from the West Coast of North America all the way to Europe. On the new record, Trail of Dead stays true to the dark, brooding, louder than life punk ethos that fueled their early success. Get the goods from this one of a kind Austin original and keep up with the band in the links provided!

WEBSITE || FACEBOOK || TWITTER || INSTAGRAM


Host: Laurie Gallardo
Audio Engineer: Cliff Hargrove, Jake Perlman
Producer: Deidre Gott
Cameras: Gabriel C. Pérez, Michael Minasi


Hikes 1.15.20

Studio 1A Sessions

Hikes 1.15.20

Posted by on Jan 15, 2020

Photo by Michael Minasi/KUTX

Lace up your hiking boots because Hikes is here to take you on a musical journey to a place where pain, beauty, and the strength to overcome it all flows in abundance.  Fronted by Filipinx naturalist Nay Wilkins, this Austin band uses their newest album, Mahal Kita (a Tagalog term for “I Love You”), to explore the empathy and compassion required to not only survive but flourish in the face of hardship and trauma. Like the subject matter it tackles, this album is the band’s most intense and musically complex album to date. Songs on the new album follow the heavy instrumental folk of previous work but take the time to blossom and unfold in a way that Hikes fans will certainly appreciate. Mahal Kita reintroduces Claire Puckett (Mother Falcon) on guitar and vocals, alongside the technical prowess of long-running members Colin Jenkins (Bass) and Chris Long (Drums), as well as marimbas from The Kraken Quartet. Get a sneak preview of the new music from their recent visit to Studio 1A and make plans to catch the band at their album release show at Barracuda on Friday, January 17th w/ Kraken Quartet and Christelle Bofale!

WEBSITE || TWITTER || INSTAGRAM || FACEBOOK

Host: Taylor Wallace
Audio Engineer/Post Production: Jake Perlman
Cameras: Gabriel C. Pérez, Michael Minasi
Producer: Deidre Gott